Spacetime with Torsion

Lecture by Nikodem Poplawski
Дополнительные данные
552
Просмотров
Презентации > Наука
Дата публикации: 2012-02-07
Страниц: 70
1

Universe, Black Holes and Particles  in Spacetime with Torsion Nikodem J. Popławski Department of Physics, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN IU High Energy/Astro Seminar 20 September 2010

Outline 1. Einstein‐Cartan‐Kibble‐Sciama theory of gravity 2. Spin fluids with torsion 3. Cosmology with torsion: alternative to inflation 4. Black holes with torsion: origin of universes & arrow of time 5. Mass generation by torsion 6. Preferred direction inside black holes 7. Dirac particles with torsion 8. Dark energy from torsion 9. Summary

Outline 1. Einstein‐Cartan‐Kibble‐Sciama theory of gravity 2. Spin fluids with torsion 3. Cosmology with torsion: alternative to inflation 4. Black holes with torsion: origin of universes & arrow of time 5. Mass generation by torsion 6. Preferred direction inside black holes 7. Dirac particles with torsion 8. Dark energy from torsion 9. Summary

Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity • Spacetime described by the (symmetric) metric tensor gμν • Differentiation of tensors requires another geometrical structure: the affine connection Γρμν • Covariant derivative of vectors defined as: ∇νVμ=νVμ+ΓμρνVρ Vμ=gμνVν ∇νVμ=νVμ‐ΓρμνVρ Vμ=gμνVν • Covariant derivatives of tensor defined as for products of vectors • The affine connection gives the curvature tensor: Rρσμν=μΓρσν‐νΓρσμ+ΓρτμΓτσν‐ΓρτνΓτσμ • Riemann spacetime: ∇ρgμν=0 (metricity) and Γρμν=Γρνμ, which gives Γρμν={ρμν} (symmetric Levi‐Civita connection), where the Christoffel symbols are defined as: {ρμν}=gρσ(μgνσ+νgμσ‐σgμν)/2

Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity • Matter described by the dynamical energy‐momentum tensor: Tμν=2δLm/[(‐g)1/2δgμν], where Lm is the matter Lagrangian density • The gravitational field described by the Einstein‐Hilbert Lagrangian density: Lg= ‐R(‐g)1/2/(2k), where R=Rμνgμν, Rμν=Rρμρν is the Ricci tensor (symmetric for a Riemann spacetime), g=det(gμν), and k=8πG/c4 • The principle of stationary (least) action with respect to variations δgμν gives the Einstein field equations (1915): Gμν=Rμν‐Rgμν/2=kTμν, which are relativistic generalizations of the Poisson equation for the gravitational potential φ (in a weak field g00≈1+2φ/c2, g0α=0, gαβ=‐δαβ): Mφ=4πGρ, where ρ=T00/c2 is the mass density

Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity • The equations of motion of matter contained in the field equations: the Bianchi identities ∇μGμν=0 gives ∇μTμν=0 • Perfect fluids described by Tμν=²uμuν‐pgμν, where uμ=dxμ/ds is the four‐velocity, ds2=gμνdxμdxν, ² is the energy density and p is the pressure of the fluid • For dust (p=0) or point particles, the equations of motions become the geodesic equations: duμ/ds+Γμνρuνuρ=0, which are relativistic generalizations of Newton’s equations • In vacuum, the Einstein equations reduce to Rμν=0 • Locally, gμν can always be transformed to diag(1,‐1,‐1,‐1)  (where the Einstein‐Lorentz Special Theory of Relativity applies)

Einstein‐Cartan‐Kibble‐Sciama theory • General relativity does not take into account the spin of matter • The affine connection can be generalized by abandoning the requirement of its symmetry and allowing the torsion tensor Sρμν=Γρ[μν]=(Γρμν‐Γρνμ)/2 to be different from zero (Cartan 1921) • Metricity gives Γρμν={ρμν}+Cρμν, where Cρμν=Sρμν+Sμνρ+Sνμρ is the contortion tensor • Dynamical variables: gμν and Cμνρ • Matter described also by the spin tensor:  sμνρ=2δLm/[(‐g)1/2δCμνρ], which is different from zero for Dirac spinor fields and viscous fluids • The ECKS Lagrangian density for the gravitational field same as the EH one in general relativity (simplest theory with torsion)

Einstein‐Cartan‐Kibble‐Sciama theory • The principle of least action with respect to δgμν gives R{}μν‐ R{}gμν/2=k(Tμν+Uμν), where Uμν=[CρμρCσνσ‐CρμσCσνρ‐(CρσρCτστ‐CσρτCτρσ)gμν/2]/k • The principle of least action with respect to δCμνρ gives a linear algebraic relation (Kibble 1961, Sciama 1962): Sρμν‐Sμδρν +Sνδρμ= ‐ksμνρ/2, where Sμ=Sνμν Torsion, unlike metric, does not propagate • In the absence of spinors and viscous fluids (including vacuum), Sρμν vanishes: ECKS equations reduce to the Einstein equations in GR • Uμν is quadratic in the spin tensor • Contributions to curvature from spin ∝ k2 (significant at high ρ)

Einstein‐Cartan‐Kibble‐Sciama theory • The field equations can be written using the full Ricci tensor: Rμν‐Rgμν/2=Θμν, where the canonical energy‐momentum tensor is given by the Belinfante‐Rosenfeld relation Θμν=Tμν+∇∗ρ(sμνρ+sρνμ+sρμν)/2                  ∇∗ρ=∇ρ‐2Sρ • This relation agrees with the conservation law for the spin tensor: ∇∗ρsμνρ=(Θμν‐Θνμ), which results from the cyclic identity (μ, ν, ρ cyclically permutated) Rσμνρ= ‐2∇μSσνρ +4SστμSτνρ • The Bianchi identities (μ, ν, ρ cyclically permutated) ∇μRστνρ=2RστπμSπνρ give the conservation law for the energy‐momentum tensor: DνΘμν=CνρμΘνρ+sνρσRνρσμ/2                       Dν=∇{}ν F. W. Hehl, P. von der Heyde, G. D. Kerlick & J. M. Nester, Rev. Mod. Phys. 48, 393 (1976)

Einstein‐Cartan‐Kibble‐Sciama theory • The field equations in both GR and ECKS theory can be written as: Rμν‐Rgμν/2=Θμν • The difference between GR and ECKS: GR – the torsion set to zero ECKS – the torsion is a dynamical variable, which turns out to be proportional to the spin density of fermionic matter; it can be zero • Torsion significant when Uμν ∼ Tμν For fermionic matter (quarks and leptons): ρ>1045 kg m‐3 Nuclear matter in neutron stars: ρ∼1017 kg m‐3 Gravitational effects of torsion negligible even for neutron stars E. A. Lord, Tensors, Relativity and Cosmology (McGraw‐Hill, 1976);  N. J. Popławski, arXiv:0911.0334

Outline 1. Einstein‐Cartan‐Kibble‐Sciama theory of gravity 2. Spin fluids with torsion 3. Cosmology with torsion: alternative to inflation 4. Black holes with torsion: origin of universes & arrow of time 5. Mass generation by torsion 6. Preferred direction inside black holes 7. Dirac particles with torsion 8. Dark energy from torsion 9. Summary

Spin fluids • Consider matter distributed over a small region in space with the  coordinates xμ(s), forming an extended body whose motion represented by a world tube (Mathisson 1937, Papapetrou 1951) The motion of the body as a whole described by a wordline Xμ(s) • Define δxα=xα‐Xα,  δx0=0,  uμ=dXμ/ds,  α ‐ spatial coordinates Define Mμνρ= ‐u0∫δxμΘνρ (‐g)1/2dV, Nμνρ= u0∫sμνρ (‐g)1/2dV Assume the dimensions of the body small – higher‐order (in δxμ) integrals vanish • The conservation law for the spin tensor gives, after omitting surface integrals: Mρμν‐Mρνμ=Nμνρ‐Nμν0uρ/u0 (*) K. Nomura, T. Shirafuji & K. Hayashi, Prog. Theor. Phys. 86, 1239 (1991)

Spin fluids • In cosmological and astrophysical applications, we can average fermionic matter as a continuum (fluid), neglecting Mρμν (*) gives the form of the macroscopic spin tensor of a spin fluid: sμνρ=sμνuρ,  sμνuν=0  (Weyssenhoff & Raabe 1947) • Similarly, the conservation law for the energy‐momentum tensor  gives the form of the macroscopic canonical energy‐momentum  tensor Θμν=cΠμuν, where Πμ is the four‐momentum density Adding the pressure leads to Θμν=cΠμuν‐p(gμν‐uμuν)                       ²=cΠμuμ, s2=sμνsμν/2 The dynamical energy‐momentum tensor for a spin fluid: F. W. Hehl, P. von der Heyde & G. D. Kerlick, Phys. Rev. D 10, 1066 (1974)

Spin fluids • In cosmological and astrophysical applications, we can average fermionic matter as a continuum (fluid), neglecting Mρμν (*) gives the form of the macroscopic spin tensor of a spin fluid: sμνρ=sμνuρ,  sμνuν=0  (Weyssenhoff & Raabe 1947) • Similarly, the conservation law for the energy‐momentum tensor  gives the form of the macroscopic canonical energy‐momentum  tensor Θμν=cΠμuν, where Πμ is the four‐momentum density Adding the pressure leads to Θμν=cΠμuν‐p(gμν‐uμuν)                       ²=cΠμuμ, s2=sμνsμν/2 The dynamical energy‐momentum tensor for a spin fluid: for random spin orientation energy density                 pressure                                F. W. Hehl, P. von der Heyde & G. D. Kerlick, Phys. Rev. D 10, 1066 (1974)

Outline 1. Einstein‐Cartan‐Kibble‐Sciama theory of gravity 2. Spin fluids with torsion 3. Cosmology with torsion: alternative to inflation 4. Black holes with torsion: origin of universes & arrow of time 5. Mass generation by torsion 6. Preferred direction inside black holes 7. Dirac particles with torsion 8. Dark energy from torsion 9. Summary

Cosmology with torsion • Consider a closed, homogeneous and isotropic Universe, described by the Friedman‐Lemaitre‐Robertson‐Walker metric (k=1) The distance from the origin to its antipodal point is aπ • The Friedman equations for the scale factor a: gravitational repulsion from torsion The 2nd equation can be written as a conservation law: • Particle number density n satisfies dn/n=d²/(²+p) Consider a barotropic fluid: p=w²  n ∝ ²1/(1+w)

Cosmology with torsion • Spin fluid of fermions with no spin polarization: implying s2 ∝ ²2/(1+w) The Friedman conservation law gives ² ∝ a‐3(1+w) as without spin Thus the spin‐torsion contribution to the energy density scales as Independent of w, consistent with the particle conservation n ∝ a‐3 ²S decouples from ², formally: spin fluid = perfect fluid + exotic fluid (with p=²= ‐ks2/4<0) • Consider the very early universe: w=1/3 (radiation),  ² ≈ ²R ∼ a‐4 Universe dominated by relic background photons and neutrinos I. S. Nurgaliev & W. N. Ponomariev, Phys. Lett. B 130, 378 (1983) M. Gasperini, Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 2873 (1986)

Cosmology with torsion • Total effective energy density of a spin fluid where                 and 0 denotes present time Contributions from dark matter and cosmological constant scale like a‐3 and a0 – negligible at very small a • The 1st Friedman equation can be written as where                   is the Hubble parameter,  i=²i/²c are the density parameters, and                         is the critical density Curvature contribution in H also negligible at very small a:

Cosmology with torsion • Gravitational repulsion from spin & torsion (S<0) prevents the cosmological (Big‐Bang) singularity The Universe starts expanding when H=0, at which it has a minimum radius             (choose t=0 there) W. Kopczyński, Phys. Lett. A 39, 219 (1972) A. Trautman, Nature (Phys. Sci.) 242, 7 (1973) (w=0) • Integrating the Friedman eq. gives the expansion of the Universe: at x>>1,                     and               (radiation epoch) • Total density parameter at any instant The velocity of the antipode NJP, arXiv: 1007.0587

Cosmology with torsion • WMAP parameters of the Universe =1.002,  H0‐1=4.4×1017s,  R=8.8×10‐5 NJP, arXiv: 1007.0587  a0=2.9×1027m • In GR, S=0 and am=0: (a)  1 as a  0 according to If  is near 1 today then (a) at the GUT epoch must have been tuned to 1 to a precision of more than 52 decimal places Flatness problem in Big‐Bang cosmology Solved by cosmic inflation: exponential expansion of the Universe by the factor of 1026 in radius, driven by a negative‐pressure vacuum energy density, pushes (a) sufficiently close to 1 at GUT from a  reasonable (not tuned) value i∼1 (Guth; Linde; Albrecht & Steinhardt) Inflation requires additional physics (e.g., scalar fields) with extra  parameters and unexplained requirements (length of inflation, i∼1)

Cosmology with torsion • In the ECKS gravity, (a)=∞ at a=am and has a local minimum at                 , NJP, arXiv: 1007.0587 where it is equal to • Background neutrinos – most abundant fermions in the Universe:  n=5.6×107 m‐3 for each type • ECKS theory gives S= –8.6× 10‐70 (extremely small in magnitude) 

Cosmology with torsion • In the ECKS gravity, (a)=∞ at a=am and has a local minimum at                 , NJP, arXiv: 1007.0587 where it is equal to • Background neutrinos – most abundant fermions in the Universe:  n=5.6×107 m‐3 for each type • ECKS theory gives S= –8.6× 10‐70 (extremely small in magnitude)  As the Universe expands from       to          , which takes , (a) rapidly decreases from ∞ to the value that appears tuned to 1 to a precision of ∼ 63 decimal places!

Cosmology with torsion • Torsion solves the flatness problem without needing Inflation • An extremely rapid expansion of the Universe caused by an extremely small and negative torsion density parameter S ∼ ‐10‐69 originating from the spin of fermions in the presence of torsion pushes (a) sufficiently close to 1, during which the Universe expands only by the factor of       , naturally producing the apparent fine tuning of (a) in the very early Universe • As the Universe expands further, S becomes negligible in (a) and its  evolution is governed by the radiation; (a)‐1 increases: • Eventually, nonrelativistic matter dominates the Universe and governs its  evolution; (a)‐1 still increases and becomes ∼1 • Ultimately, the cosmological constant dominates; (a) asymptotically decreases to 1

Cosmology with torsion • The velocity of the antipode with respect to the origin va is zero at  a=am and has a local minimum at                 , where it is equal to As the Universe expands from       to          , va rapidly increases from  0 to ∼ 1032 c, then it decreases according to • According to H(a), the Universe is contracting before t=0 – this contraction is  the time reversal of the following expansion • If the closed Universe were causally connected at some instant t<0 then it  remains causally connected until t=0 and also during the subsequent expansion  until va reaches c, then the origin cannot communicate with points receding with  v>c (whose distance from the origin πa is larger than the Hubble radius dH=c/H) • The universe contains N ∼ (va/c)3 causally disconnected volumes: S ∼ ‐10‐69 produces N ≈ 1096 from a single causally connected  region – torsion solves the horizon problem without inflation

Outline 1. Einstein‐Cartan‐Kibble‐Sciama theory of gravity 2. Spin fluids with torsion 3. Cosmology with torsion: alternative to inflation 4. Black holes with torsion: origin of universes & arrow of time 5. Mass generation by torsion 6. Preferred direction inside black holes 7. Dirac particles with torsion 8. Dark energy from torsion 9. Summary

Black holes with torsion • According to H(a), the contraction of the Universe before t=0 looks like the  time reversal of the subsequent expansion: the Universe was contracting from  infinity in the past. • The model of the Universe contracting from infinity not compelling: it does not  explain what caused such a contraction. Like Big‐Bang cosmology cannot explain what happened before an extremely hot  and dense state of the Universe at the Big Bang. • There exist mechanisms that can cause the time asymmetry between the  contraction and expansion. If the contracting Universe were anisotropic in the  past then the enormous tidal gravitational forces cause an intense particle  production which increases the mass inside a black hole and isotropizes the  subsequently expanding Universe. String electromagnetic interactions between  fermions at very high energies may cause their spins to align. As a result, linear (in  spin) terms in the energy‐momentum tensor of a spin fluid do not vanish. The spin  tensor acts like viscosity, increasing the entropy of the Universe. L. Parker, Phys. Rev. 183, 1057 (1969); Ya. B. Zel’dovich, J. Exp. Theor. Phys. Lett. 12, 307 (1970); Ya. B. Zel’dovich & A. A. Starobinsky, J. Exp. Theor. Phys. Lett. 26, 252 (1978).

Black holes with torsion • Idea: every collapsing black hole produces a new universe inside (Smolin 1992)

Black holes with torsion • Accordingly, our Universe is the interior of a black hole existing in  another universe (Pathria 1972)

Black holes with torsion • Our Universe is the interior of a black hole (Stuckey 1994) • All those models do not provide a physical mechanism of how a  black hole produces a universe inside and how it avoids a singularity • Torsion provides such a mechanism!

Black holes with torsion • Every observed black hole is an Einstein‐Rosen bridge (NJP 2010; C. Sagan, Contact, 1985)

Black holes with torsion NJP, Phys. Lett. B 687, 110 (2010)

Black holes with torsion I would like to thank Steve Chaplin for popularizing this work!

Black holes with torsion

Black holes with torsion

Black holes with torsion

Black holes with torsion

Black holes with torsion

Black holes with torsion • The motion of a point at the surface of a gravitationally collapsing  star is mathematically equivalent to the motion of a particle in the  gravitational field of the star that has collapsed (Tolman 1930). • When a very massive star collapses to a black hole and the event  horizon forms, the interior of the black hole becomes at this  moment a closed universe (Smolin 1992). • It results from that all causal geodesics cross an event horizon  radially.  An observer near a black hole, because of the curved  spacetime, sees the black hole in front of her, and also some of it  behind her.                                         D. Raine & E. Thomas, Black Holes: An Introduction, (Imperial College Press, 2009)

Black holes with torsion distant observer’s view                   infalling observer’s view of BH

Black holes with torsion • The proposed scenario for the origin of our Universe may explain  the arrow of time. • Although the laws of the ECKS theory of gravity (and GR too) are  time‐symmetric, the boundary conditions of a Universe in a black  hole are not, because the motion of matter through the event  horizon of the black hole is unidirectional and thus it can define the  arrow of time. event horizon • The arrow of cosmic time of a universe inside a black hole would  then be fixed by the time‐asymmetric collapse of matter through the event horizon, before the subsequent expansion.

Black holes with torsion • The proposed scenario for the origin of our Universe may explain  the arrow of time. • Although the laws of the ECKS theory of gravity (and GR too) are  time‐symmetric, the boundary conditions of a Universe in a black  hole are not, because the motion of matter through the event  horizon of the black hole is unidirectional and thus it can define the  arrow of time. event horizon future                           past • The arrow of cosmic time of a universe inside a black hole would  then be fixed by the time‐asymmetric collapse of matter through the event horizon, before the subsequent expansion.

Black holes with torsion • A causally connected, massive star collapses gravitationally to a  black hole and an event horizon (its boundary) forms. • Inside the horizon, the spacetime is nonstationary and matter  collapses further. Mathematically, this collapse is equivalent to a  contracting closed universe. The 1st Friedman eq. for the interior of a black hole (k=1): + Λa2/3 • The term with Λ negligible, so is (initially) the term with s2. As a decreases, k eventually becomes negligible. Assuming p=0 and using the (constant) mass of the black hole M=4πa3²/3c2 & particle number N=4πa3n/3 gives (Trautman 1973)

Black holes with torsion • At extremely high densities, much larger than the density of  nuclear matter, the torsion of spacetime manifests itself as a force  that counters gravity.  • As a decreases, gravity initially overcomes torsion’s repulsion and  matter in a black hole collapses, but eventually the torsion becomes  very strong and prevents the matter from compressing indefinitely to  a state of infinite density (singularity). The matter instead reaches a state of finite, extremely large density  (when          and a=am) after the time tc, stops collapsing, rebounds,  and starts rapidly expanding.  The rapid recoil after the bounce could be what has led to our  expanding Universe: spatially flat, homogeneous and isotropic.  • For M=10 solar masses and N=M/mp: am ∼ 10‐9 m, tc ∼ 10‐4 s

Black holes with torsion • As a increases after the bounce, the term with s2 in the Friedman  eq. becomes insignificant and k becomes relevant (Λ still negligible). • The scale factor a increases until          , which occurs at a=rg=2GM/c2 (Schwarzschild radius of the universe). • Then the universe starts collapsing and the cycle repeats – cannot  describe our Universe, which is much larger. • Possible solution: extremely strong gravitational fields near the  bounce cause an intense particle production, increasing the mass  inside a black hole, without changing the total (matter + gravity)  energy of such a closed universe. Mechanisms could include: ‐ Parker‐Zel’dovich‐Starobinsky production by the Weyl tensor, ‐ matter creation by covariant derivatives of four‐velocity (Hoyle 1949), ‐ matter creation by scalar fields (Hoyle & Narlikar 1963) etc. F. I. Cooperstock & M. Israelit, Found. Phys. 25, 631 (1995)

Spin fluids • In cosmological and astrophysical applications, we can average fermionic matter as a continuum (fluid), neglecting Mρμν (*) gives the form of the macroscopic spin tensor of a spin fluid: sμνρ=sμνuρ,  sμνuν=0  (Weyssenhoff & Raabe 1947) • Similarly, the conservation law for the energy‐momentum tensor  gives the form of the macroscopic canonical energy‐momentum  tensor Θμν=cΠμuν, where Πμ is the four‐momentum density Adding the pressure leads to Θμν=cΠμuν‐p(gμν‐uμuν)                       ²=cΠμuμ, s2=sμνsμν/2 The dynamical energy‐momentum tensor for a spin fluid: for random spin orientation energy density                 pressure                                F. W. Hehl, P. von der Heyde & G. D. Kerlick, Phys. Rev. D 10, 1066 (1974)

Spin fluids • In cosmological and astrophysical applications, we can average fermionic matter as a continuum (fluid), neglecting Mρμν (*) gives the form of the macroscopic spin tensor of a spin fluid: sμνρ=sμνuρ,  sμνuν=0  (Weyssenhoff & Raabe 1947) • Similarly, the conservation law for the energy‐momentum tensor  gives the form of the macroscopic canonical energy‐momentum  tensor Θμν=cΠμuν, where Πμ is the four‐momentum density Adding the pressure leads to Θμν=cΠμuν‐p(gμν‐uμuν)                       ²=cΠμuμ, s2=sμνsμν/2 The dynamical energy‐momentum tensor for a spin fluid: Hoyle matter creation can be energy density                 pressure                                realized by a spin fluid & torsion

Black holes with torsion Λc=4/(9rg2) or Mc=c2/(3GΛ1/2) Mc=c2 Torsion cosmology allows the following scenario: a universe in a black hole undergoes a sequence of expansions and contractions until its (growing) mass  exceeds the critical mass Mc,  which depends on the  cosmological constant. Then  the universe expands to  infinity.  Differs from a cyclic model of Steinhardt & Turok (2002). Cosmological models with k=1 and nonzero Λ H. Bondi, Cosmology (Cambridge Univ. Press ,1960); E. A. Lord, Tensors, Relativity and Cosmology.

Black holes with torsion • The formation and evolution of a new universe in a black hole is  not visible for observers outside the black hole, for whom the  horizon’s formation and all subsequent processes occur after an  infinite amount of time had elasped (because of the time dilation by  gravity). Such a new universe is thus a separate, closed spacetime branch with its own timeline; it can last infinitely long and grow  infinitely large if dark energy is present. • As the universe in a black hole expands to infinity, the boundary of  the black hole becomes an Einstein‐Rosen bridge or wormhole  (Flamm 1916, Weyl 1917, Einstein & Rosen 1935) connecting this  (daughter) universe with the outer (mother) universe. • In this model, the fundamental constants of a daughter universe are inherited  from its mother universe without any changes. Smolin’s scenario assumes that  such changes actully do occur, providing a mechanism for a cosmological “natural  selection”.

Outline 1. Einstein‐Cartan‐Kibble‐Sciama theory of gravity 2. Spin fluids with torsion 3. Cosmology with torsion: alternative to inflation 4. Black holes with torsion: origin of universes & arrow of time 5. Mass generation by torsion 6. Preferred direction inside black holes 7. Dirac particles with torsion 8. Dark energy from torsion 9. Summary

Mass generation by torsion • Torsion can produce a massive vector field, which could possibly  be a significant mechanism for the mass generation in the very early  Universe. Related to projective‐invariance breaking. • Consider the ECKS Lagrangian density with two additional simple  terms for propagating torsion (comma denotes a partial derivative): • The principle of least action with respect to δCμνρ gives a Proca‐ like equation for a massive vector Sμ (colon denotes a covariant  derivative with respect to the Christoffel symbols), which becomes a  Maxwell‐like equation only for β=‐8/3: • The simplest case β=0 gives a massive vector   NJP, Int. J. Theor. Phys. 49, 1481 (2010)

How to test that every black hole  contains a hidden universe?

How to test that every black hole  contains a hidden universe? To boldly go where no one has gone before.

Outline 1. Einstein‐Cartan‐Kibble‐Sciama theory of gravity 2. Spin fluids with torsion 3. Cosmology with torsion: alternative to inflation 4. Black holes with torsion: origin of universes & arrow of time 5. Mass generation by torsion 6. Preferred direction inside black holes 7. Dirac particles with torsion 8. Dark energy from torsion 9. Summary

Preferred direction in a black hole • Torsion as a simpler and more natural alternative to inflation may be an indirect support for our Universe as the interior of a black hole. • If our Universe were in a rotating (Kerr) black hole (most stars rotate) then it  should have inherited a preferred direction which would introduce small  corrections to the FLRW metric, depending on the Kerr length a=L/(Mc), where L is the angular momentum of the black hole. These corrections could be the  source of Lorentz‐violating parameters of the Standard Model Extension  (Kostelecký) which may be related to the matter‐antimatter asymmetry in neutral‐meson oscillations and to neutrino oscillations. • Simple estimation. GRS 1915+105, which is the heaviest and fastest spinning,  known stellar black hole in the Milky Way Galaxy, has a < 26 km. Lighter or slower  spinning black holes have smaller values of a. To compare, the preferred‐frame  parameter ‐2.4 × 10−19 GeV in a model for neutrino oscillations using Lorentz  violation corresponds to the length of 820 m. J. E. McClintock et al., Astrophys. J. 652, 518 (2006) T. Katori, V. A. Kostelecký & R. Tayloe, Phys. Rev. D 74, 105009 (2006) A. Kostelecký & R. Van Kooten, arXiv:1007.5312

Outline 1. Einstein‐Cartan‐Kibble‐Sciama theory of gravity 2. Spin fluids with torsion 3. Cosmology with torsion: alternative to inflation 4. Black holes with torsion: origin of universes & arrow of time 5. Mass generation by torsion 6. Preferred direction inside black holes 7. Dirac particles with torsion 8. Dark energy from torsion 9. Summary

Dirac particles with torsion • The Dirac Lagrangian in curved spacetime: gives the totally antisymmetric spin tensor for a Dirac field: and the Dirac‐Heisenberg‐Ivanenko‐Hehl‐Datta equation • The conservation law (*) Mρμν‐Mρνμ=Nμνρ‐Nμν0uρ/u0 for such a  spin tensor requires Mρμν to be nonzero – Dirac particles must be  extended objects with spatial extension on the order of the Cartan radius: Uμν ∼ Tμν F. W. Hehl & B. K. Datta, J. Math. Phys. 12, 1334 (1971) NJP, Phys. Lett. B 690, 73 (2010)

Dirac particles with torsion • The Cartan radius for an electron is given by                        so it is rC ∼ 10‐27 m. • We conjecture that the Cartan radius of an electron provides an  effective ultraviolet cutoff in quantum field theory for fermions in  the ECKS spacetime. • The Kerr‐Newman metric which is a solution of the Einstein‐Maxwell equations  describing a rotating, electrically charged mass. Remarkably, the Kerr‐Newman  solution has the same gyromagnetic ratio as that of a Dirac electron, which suggested treating this solution as a classical model of an extended electron in GR.  The Dirac equation may be incorporated into the Kerr‐Newman geometry in which  the wave function of a Dirac electron acquires an extended spacetime structure: a  singular ring of the Compton size. • We conjecture that the ECKS torsion modifies such a ring, by replacing it with a  toroidal structure whose outer radius is on the order of the Compton wavelength  and inner radius is on the order of the Cartan radius. Work ongoing. A. Burinskii, J. Phys. A 41, (164069 (2008).

Outline 1. Einstein‐Cartan‐Kibble‐Sciama theory of gravity 2. Spin fluids with torsion 3. Cosmology with torsion: alternative to inflation 4. Black holes with torsion: origin of universes & arrow of time 5. Mass generation by torsion 6. Preferred direction inside black holes 7. Dirac particles with torsion 8. Dark energy from torsion 9. Summary

Simplest explanation of current cosmic acceleration (dark energy) – positive Cosmological Constant (or vacuum energy density) Measured value:  Quantum field theory – zero‐point energy of vacuum: 120 orders of magnitude larger than observed – very bad Zel’dovich:                               cosmological constant from particle physics (dimensional arguments) Arguments for Λ = 0   – before cosmic acceleration discovered (Hawking; Linde; Coleman) Huge cosmological constant from zero‐point energy of vacuum may be reduced via dynamical processes (Abbott; Brown & Teitelboim; Steinhardt & Turok; Klinkhamer & Volovik) Or: Λ can be simply another constant of Nature

Cosmological constant from particle physics (examples) • QCD trace anomaly from gluon and quark condensates (Schutzhold) • QCD gluon condensate (Klinkhamer & Volovik) resembles Zel’dovich formula  • QCD chiral quark condensate (Urban & Zhitnitsky) • Electroweak phase transition (Klinkhamer & Volovik) • BCS condensate of fermions and torsion (Alexander, Biswas & Calcagni)

Dirac Lagrangian and torsion → Heisenberg‐Ivanenko equation (semicolon – GR covariant derivative) Effective metric Lagrangian for H‐I equation Energy‐momentum tensor for H‐I Lagrangian

H‐I energy‐momentum tensor  GR part                             cosmological term Effective cosmological constant       Vacuum energy density Not constant in time, but constant in space at cosmological distances for homogeneous and isotropic Universe

Cosmological constant if spinor field forms condensate with nonzero vacuum expectation value, e.g., in QCD Vacuum‐state‐dominance approximation M. A. Shifman, A. I. Vainshtein & V. I. Zakharov, Nucl. Phys. B 147, 385 (1979) For quark fields Axial vector‐axial vector form of H‐I four‐fermion interaction gives positive cosmological constant

Cosmological constant from QCD vacuum and ECKS torsion reproduces Zel’dovich formula      This value would agree with observations if • Energy scale of torsion‐induced cosmological constant from QCD vacuum only ~ 8 times larger than observed • Contribution from spinor fields with lower VEV, e.g. neutrino condensates could decrease average                  such that torsion‐ induced cosmological constant would agree with observations • Simplest model predicting positive cosmological constant and ~ its energy scale; does not use new fields

Dark energy from torsion I would like to thank James Bjorken for valuable discussions and  on torsion during CPT ’10, and Eduardo Guendelman for valuable information on ER bridges

Outline 1. Einstein‐Cartan‐Kibble‐Sciama theory of gravity 2. Spin fluids with torsion 3. Cosmology with torsion: alternative to inflation 4. Black holes with torsion: origin of universes & arrow of time 5. Mass generation by torsion 6. Preferred direction inside black holes 7. Dirac particles with torsion 8. Dark energy from torsion 9. Summary

Summary • The Einstein‐Cartan‐Kibble‐Sciama theory of gravity naturally extends general relativity to account for the spin of elementary particles, which causes spacetime to exhibit a geometrical property called torsion. • At densities much larger than that of nuclear matter, the torsion manifests itself as a force that counters gravity. • Torsion’s repulsion not only prevents the formation of unphysical singularities in collapsing black holes, but also allows for a scenario in which every black hole produces a new universe inside. • Our own Universe may be the interior of a black hole existing in another universe. Main question: where the observed amount of mass come from? • This scenario could explain the origin of the Big Bang and the arrow of time. • This scenario also explains why the Universe today appears spatially flat, homogeneous and isotropic (the flatness and horizon problems) without needing cosmic inflation. Need to check predictions for structure formation.

Summary • If we were living in a rotating black hole then our Universe should have a “preferred direction”. • This preferred direction could be related to the observed matter‐antimatter imbalance and neutrino oscillations. • Torsion could generate masses of vector particles. • Torsion could also be the source of mysterious dark energy that accelerates the Universe. • Torsion requires Dirac particles to be spatially extended, which could solve the problems in quantum field theory arising from treating them as points. Torsion may be a unifying concept in physics that could resolve most major current problems of theoretical physics and cosmology

Questions • Magnetic‐monopole problem in cosmology with torsion. According to GUT, the very early Universe should have contained a number of heavy, stable particles that have not yet been observed, such as magnetic monopoles. Magnetic monopoles should have persisted as the primary constituent of the present Universe. Where are they? Inflation provides a solution: they become separated as the Universe expands exponentially, lowering their observed density by many orders of magnitude. M. Rees: "Skeptics about exotic physics might not be hugely impressed by a theoretical argument to explain the absence of particles that are themselves only hypothetical. Preventive medicine can readily seem 100 percent effective against a disease that doesn't exist!“

Questions • Flatness and horizon problems in cosmology with torsion. They are solved because of a negative and extremely small in magnitude torsion density parameter of the present Universe. Could such a value of this parameter be regarded as a fine tuning? The value of the torsion density parameter is very small in magnitude because the spin‐spin interaction induced by the torsion in the ECKS theory gravity becomes significant when the density of matter reaches the order of the Cartan density for an electron. This density is much smaller than the Planck density, which may suggest that the resolution of the flatness and horizons problems by torsion results from the mass hierarchy problem.

Chkmark
Всё

понравилось?
Поделиться с друзьями
Prev
Next

Отзывы